Suicide Prevention Training

Upcoming Suicide Prevention Training Live and Interactive CEs



Self-Study CEs

Suicide Prevention: What to Know and What to Do (Recorded Event)

Presented by Jon Mandracchia, PhD

2.0 Clock hour

* This course meets Suicide Prevention requirement for licensure renewal. *

Suicide is a serious and prevalent problem that most mental healthcare providers will encounter at some point in their career regardless of the setting in or population with which they work.  This presentation will introduce the topic of suicide by presenting the prevalence of suicide in general along with specific demographic data.  Attendees will then learn about risk and protective factors associated with suicide, while considering the differences between risk/protective factors and causal factors for suicide ideation and behavior.  To promote a better understanding of the actual underlying mechanisms of suicide, a brief overview of the Interpersonal Theory of Suicide will be presented as one possible explanation for serious suicide attempts and completed suicide that has gained empirical support in recent years.  After presenting information to better understand the overall scope and potential causes of suicide, the presentation will turn to specific recommendations for assessing and responding to individuals who may be at risk for suicide ideation or making a serious suicide attempt.  Many of these recommendations are specific for licensed mental healthcare providers (and those who are in-training); however, more basic forms of assessment and response will be presented that may be employed by the general public. 


Early Detection of Suicide Risk in Older Populations (Recorded Event)

SELF STUDY

Presented by Gary U. Behrman, PhD, MSW, M.Div.

* This course meets Suicide Prevention requirement for licensure renewal. *

For over a decade, the suicide rates in the U.S. are rising.  Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the general population, with suicides outnumbering homicides by more than two to one. Among all populations, white males over the age of 55 are at highest risk for suicidal ideation and completion. It is critical that social workers are educated in how to assess, treat, and refer to appropriate levels of care to lower the risks for suicide especially among aging populations.